Development slang :)

  • YAGNI – “You aren’t gonna need it” – Is a principle of extreme programming (XP) that states a programmer should not add functionality until deemed necessary. XP co-founder Ron Jeffries has written: “Always implement things when you actually need them, never when you just foresee that you need them.” Other forms of the phrase include “You aren’t going to need it” and “You ain’t gonna need it”.
  • DTSTTCPW – Do the simplest thing that could possibly work.
  • KISS – It states that most systems work best if they are kept simple rather than made complicated; therefore simplicity should be a key goal in design and unnecessary complexity should be avoided. Keep it simple, stupid – Variations on the phrase include “keep it short and simple” and “keep it simple and straightforward”.
  • Worse is better – New Jersey style, was conceived by Richard P. Gabriel to describe the dynamics of software acceptance, but it has broader application. The idea is that quality does not necessarily increase with functionality. There is a point where less functionality (“worse”) is a preferable option (“better”) in terms of practicality and usability. Software that is limited, but simple to use, may be more appealing to the user and market than the reverse.
  • DRY – Don’t repeat yourself (DRY) is a principle of software development, aimed at reducing repetition of information of all kinds, especially useful in multi-tier architectures. The DRY principle is stated as “Every piece of knowledge must have a single, unambiguous, authoritative representation within a system.” The principle has been formulated by Andy Hunt and Dave Thomas in their book The Pragmatic Programmer. They apply it quite broadly to include “database schemas, test plans, the build system, even documentation.”
  • WET – commonly taken to stand for either “write everything twice” or “we enjoy typing”